How To Develop Cordial Workplace Relationships

Moving to a new workplace means negotiating a whole new set of personal and professional relationships. Since you will be spending the majority of your day with these people, its best all around if you manage to forge some friendships, or at least some cordial relationships, with those around you. The luckier ones find life- long friends in their offices; others have work place friendships that get them through a hard day. Making new friends or getting along with strangers can be difficult so here are some tips to get you started:

Look, Listen and Learn
You will be moving into a nest of pre- established relationships with their own hierarchy, so the best thing to do in the first few weeks is to look, listen and learn. Watch how they do things and see if you can emulate it until you’re comfortable enough to do it better; listen to the conversations and take notes about who to avoid, who to be close to, and who you can trust enough to be friends with; and finally, learn everything you can before you start to make waves. No one likes a know- it- all, particularly if they are new, so until you know you’ve been accepted into the network, keep your head down, check this out for best cakes in Melbourne.

Do Something Small and Thoughtful for Your Co- Workers
This can be something as simple as covering for a lunch break in front of the boss, or as grandiose as ordering a birthday cake delivery for an impromptu party during break time.

Starting this immediately after you arrive will raise some eyebrows, so hold it in for the first month. Then, start slow and build on it until you gain a reputation around the place as the “nice” one. Whether or not you choose to do this as a strategic move to make friends, or get in with people, it’s always better to cultivate positive relationships versus negative ones. So if you can have a birthday cake delivery for that guy in auditing who no one likes, you will have made a long and steady ally in the office. 

Avoid Gossip
Ok, so avoiding all gossip in an office is impossible, but do your best to become the person everyone tells it to, as opposed to being the one who tells it to everyone. In every office there will be the perennial gossip who everyone avoids; being outside of the immediate grapevine will therefore put you out of harm’s way. However, in the interests of being informed, it might also be necessary to know when to put in a judicious word or two to put out potential fires and diffuse a situation.